Snails at Duomo

International art collective Cracking Art Group placed 50 large-scale plastic snails all across the roof of the Duomo (the fourth largest cathedral in the world) in Milan, Italy in an effort to draw attention to and raise funds for much-needed repairs. The installation titled REgeneration features the sluggish creatures, and the commentaries point out taht the choice of these particular animals might be interpreted at least in two ways: the snail, known for its slow pace, can be alluding to the gradual deterioration of the architecture that has perhaps gone unnoticed over time. The bright blue sculptures shine a metaphoric spotlight on the cracks in the upper terrace of the cathedral that are in desperate need of restoration.

The creative team, consisting of six artists from Italy, Belgium, and France, is no stranger to this type of architecturally-conscious and morally-rooted installation. They often find themselves incorporating their site-specific signature work in environments that are in need of assistance. It’s their own social and environmental commitment within the art community that aids them in choosing their next project. It is also the dichotomy of contemporary art finding some sort of balance between classic, natural art and man-made, artificial art that drives the group’s work. They work primarily in recycled plastic, arguing that reusing the material keeps it from “toxic destruction which can devastate environment.”

As found at feeldesain.com

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This entry was posted in architecture, colour, street art, travels and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Snails at Duomo

  1. Clearly these are awesome 😀

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