The sun roses behind the Centuries

The title is quote from a Tunisian poet, Abu Al Qassim Acchabi, which was used as a subject of a mural by eL Seed – an artist whose origins inspire him in his street art work. On his wordpress page you can find this description:

eL Seed perceives Arabic Calligraphy as a tangible expression of his search for identity. Throughout his work, myriad paths intersect and mirror the multiple sources of inspiration which nourish his art. Emanating from this confusion is an amalgam of harmony and balance.

His art is a mixture of street art and Arabic Calligraphy. It is the product of a double marginality, that of an oriental art seeking a voice in the occidental world, and that of street art struggling to legitimize its presence on the contemporary art scene. This duality enables the reconciling of two supposedly opposing worlds and two supposedly clashing cultures.

eL  Seed no longer tags his name on walls. He has decided to adopt a proverbial tradition in which the name disappears and only the message remains. Therefore, rather than searching for what distinguishes him from others, eL Seed searches for what unites him and others. His art is a link, an arm outstretched, a bridge towards those who are open to his message.”

I must admit I am profoundly enchanted by his works, maybe because of the precision and natural beauty which lies in the Arabic caligraphy (in fact, I like the lettering so much I have a tattoo in Arabic). I have a slight incling that his works are going to reappear here frequently.

So, about the piece itself – it is painted on one of the winding streets of the city of Tunis – the author says that he was spontaneously offered this wall, belonging to family of a person he was talking with, during a chat in one of the city’s cafe.

The calligraphy spells a quote by Tunisian poet Abu Al Qassim Acchabi: “The sun rose behind the centuries.”
”واطل الصباح من وراء القرون”
So it might well go under my little cycle: “poetry on walls”.

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This entry was posted in poetry, street art, travels and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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