For the love of libraries! 4

Autumn is a good time for reading – and I am a good example of this thesis, frequently visiting two libraries and enjoying some good reads. I decided it’s high time to come back to the series about libraries. And while for the past time I have either concentrated on the historical and architectural aspects and later on, the most surprising, smallest libraries (links to all three parts below) this time I want to present some wonderful examples of how unused structures around the world have been repurposed into astonishing libraries – after all, what better way to recycle just about anything than to turn it into a center for knowledge?

The McAllen Public Library, built inside a 124,500 square foot abandoned Walmart in McAllen, Texas.

McAllen, Texas - walmart

The Central Library in Cape Town, Republic of South Africa built inside an old drill hall. 

cape town - old drill house

Nassau Public Library in Nassau, Bahamas, once a colonial jail, but converted into a library in 1873. 

Nassau, Bahamas, once a colonial jail

Jackson Public Library in Jackson, New Hampshire, USA converted from a barn built in 1858 for the town’s first inn.

jackson

BiebBus, a Dutch mobile library for kids built out of an old shipping container. 

bieb

Beautiful Bibliothèque Saint-Jean-Baptiste, Longueuil, Québec, Canada.

Bibliothèque Saint-Jean-Baptiste, Longueuil, Québec

The Biblio Trenes in Chile: disused train cars that have been converted into cool libraries. 

tren

TYIN Tegnestue Architects recently teamed up with CASE Studio and local people from the Min Buri Old Market Community area in Bangkok, Thailand to transform an old market building into a stunning social Library. Made from recycled wood and local affordable materials from a second-hand shop, the Min Buri Old Market Library is now ready for everybody to enjoy.

9612239 Old Market Library, Min Buri, BangkokFor the love of libraries! 1
For the love of libraries! 2
For the love of libraries! 3

 

 

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